News - Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa

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Flower of the Week 21/4/13

Flower of the week at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand

Flower of the week: Star Jasmine

Flower of the week: Star Jasmine
Star jasmine is a fast growing evergreen vine that produces pink-white fragrant flowers. The flowers bloom in the late winter through early spring and occasionally at other times of the year. Pink jasmine is also known as Chinese evergreen jasmine, as it is native to China. It has a wonderful aroma and grows quickly. The scent is especially wonderful in the evening...View more Content

Star jasmine is a fast growing evergreen vine that produces pink-white fragrant flowers. The flowers bloom in the late winter through early spring and occasionally at other times of the year. Pink jasmine is also known as Chinese evergreen jasmine, as it is native to China. It has a wonderful aroma and grows quickly. The scent is especially wonderful in the evening and we like to grow the vine near the walkways for guests to enjoy on the way back to their room from our restaurant.

Water Buffalo

Water Buffalo at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand

Ubiquitous throughout Thailand, even here in the mountain forests, the water buffalo is a faithful and devoted member of most rural Thai families

Flower of the week: The Rose

Flower of the week: The rose

No flower garden would be complete without the rose. At our Baan Thai Hill you will find an entire garden dedicated to roses of different sizes and colors. Here is one of our favorites; its appearance a sure sign of the coming dry season.

Flower of the Week: Red Orchid

Image captured with Nokia N-8 mobile phone

Flower of the Week 13/3/13

Image captured with Nokia N-8 mobile phone

Yum Bpai Chaa Mu

Yunan tea leaf salad of spicy minced pork with carrot, tomato, chili pepper and freshly picked tea leaf. Nang Im roadside restaurant in Doi Mae Salong. Highly recommended

Universal Love

Mother hen guarding her chicks. Musseur Hilltribe Village, Phu Chaisai Estate

Flower of the Week 6/3/13

Clear Mountain Heart Honeymoon

Thai Lana House 212 with infinity pool, mountain view, private garden. Two wonderful guests starting a new life together with a clear heart. Best wishes to Michael and Danielle of Zurich, Switzerland from everyone at Phu Chaisai.

Flower of the Week 1/3/13

When Elephants Walked Backwards

Original Thai art in an ancient style referred to as from the Himmaphan Forest, a fable/myth art form taking place in the distant past of Thailand. The beginning of an adventure of discovery and understanding

Flower of the Week 17/2/13

Flower of the Week 13/2/12

Invasion

Phu Chaisai: A great place for a getaway.

Flower of the Week 8 /2/13

Arise!

Another day, another glorious sunrise at Phu Chaisai

Flower of the Week 1/2/13

Image captured with Nokia N-8 mobile phone

Thanakorn Chaivinda

Renowned Thai artist Thanakorn Chaivinda paid a visit to Phu Chaisai with students from Chiang Mai University’s School of Art and Design.

Flower of the Week 31/1/13

Image captured with Nokia N-8 mobile phone

The Sweetest Dog

Eyes of the Window to the Soul of a Man’s Best Friend. Bon Bon, loyal companion of Phu Chaisai

Gaurdians of the Forest

Guardians of the forest: Carved wood statuettes overlooking the Mae Salong Noi Valley

Flowing River of Mist

Visibly moving, like a river of mist, the famous morning fog of Chiang Rai’s mountain valleys is on display now during the cool winter months

First Light of Dawn 1 January 2013

Good morning and Happy New Year. First light, 6.40 a.m. 1 January 2013, from somewhere in the mountains of Thailand’s Golden Triangle near Burma in the Phu Chaisai estate.

Best wishes for a happy, healthy, prosperous and joyous NEW YEAR.

Steven Roberto,

General Manager

Morning Mist

Wine List

It’s that time of year when the wispy morning mist shrouds the hills and valleys of Chiang Rai. Breathtaking scenery reveals itself slowly in the early morning hours rewarding the impatient that arise early with the songbirds.

Flower of the Week: The Spider Flower

Cleome hassleriana, commonly known as spider flower is native to southern South America in Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, and southeast Brazil. The flowers are purple, pink, and white, and the fruit is a capsule up to 15 cm long containing several seeds.

Free Daily Yoga at Phu Chaisai

All guests may now enjoy sunrise and sunset yoga with Phu Chaisai’s resident yoga master Shaun Hannocks in the yoga room at 7.30 a.m. and again at 4 p.m. each day. Group yoga instruction is now included free of charge during your stay with us.

Flower of the Week: The Cockscomb

Celosia is an edible plant in the amaranth family, native to East Africa’s highlands. It is used as a treatment for intestinal worms, blood diseases, mouth sores, and eye problems. The seeds treat chest complaints and the flowers treat diarrhea. The leaves are used as dressings for boils and sores, and the boiled vegetables are said to be slightly diuretic. Celosia...View more Content

Celosia is an edible plant in the amaranth family, native to East Africa’s highlands. It is used as a treatment for intestinal worms, blood diseases, mouth sores, and eye problems. The seeds treat chest complaints and the flowers treat diarrhea. The leaves are used as dressings for boils and sores, and the boiled vegetables are said to be slightly diuretic. Celosia cristata is a common garden ornamental plant in China and here in the Golden Triangle. The leaves have a soft texture and a mild spinach-like taste. They are prepared with such things as hot pepper, garlic, fresh lime, and red palm oil and eaten as a side dish.

Upping the Wine Game

Famous Thai sommelier and Mixologist Phanit Thongneum dropped by this month for some staff training and to help role out Phu Chaisai’s new cocktail and wine lists. We are loving Khun Nu’s version of the Sidecar and our new signature cocktail, Cowboy Arroy.

Dog of the Month: Don’t fall for Sad Eyes.

Ay Ay may look sad but it’s all an act to get your sympathy. This little lady knows how to get treats and snacks from the sympathetic. But she has nothing to feel sorry about; safe in her bed behind the lobby desk Ay Ay gets a good snooze each morning before making her round of petting and snacking with those sad eyes of hers. Don’t be fooled. Languages...View more Content

Ay Ay may look sad but it’s all an act to get your sympathy. This little lady knows how to get treats and snacks from the sympathetic. But she has nothing to feel sorry about; safe in her bed behind the lobby desk Ay Ay gets a good snooze each morning before making her round of petting and snacking with those sad eyes of hers. Don’t be fooled.

Languages spoken: Thai

Butterfly of the Month: Ghost Shirt

Of all the butterflies to glide and sail about over the flower gardens and among the forests of Phu Chaisai, the Phi Sua or Ghost Shirt butterfly is probably our favorite. Somewhat resembling the Monarch Butterfly of North America, the beautiful orange and black butterfly is graceful and industrious as it goes about its work collecting nectar from the wildflowers.

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Of all the butterflies to glide and sail about over the flower gardens and among the forests of Phu Chaisai, the Phi Sua or Ghost Shirt butterfly is probably our favorite. Somewhat resembling the Monarch Butterfly of North America, the beautiful orange and black butterfly is graceful and industrious as it goes about its work collecting nectar from the wildflowers.

Ode to a Springroll

The Thai spring roll is known as the Po Pia Taad. It’s delightfully crispy and hot to the touch on the outside, with soft and yielding slivers of vegetable and rice noodle on the inside. The springroll is quite possibly the Chinese’s greatest culinary gift to the Thai cooking tradition. Dipped into a sweet and sour dressing called Naam Jim Buay, the Po Pia Taad...View more Content

The Thai spring roll is known as the Po Pia Taad. It’s delightfully crispy and hot to the touch on the outside, with soft and yielding slivers of vegetable and rice noodle on the inside. The springroll is quite possibly the Chinese’s greatest culinary gift to the Thai cooking tradition. Dipped into a sweet and sour dressing called Naam Jim Buay, the Po Pia Taad is the yummiest and most addictive snack in the Thai chef’s arsenal.

Spring rolls have a long history in this part of the world. The delicacy first appeared in the Eastern Jin Dynasty and was served during the Spring Festival, hence the name. The making of spring rolls involves four steps: dough sheet making, fillings preparing, wrapping and deep frying. There are numerous types of fillings, but in Thailand shredded vegetables with chives and fermented rice noodle are most common.

Flower of the week: Cockscomb

This wispy flower is an edible and ornamental plants related to amaranth that originated in East Africa’s highlands. It is used as a treatment for intestinal worms, blood diseases, mouth sores and eye problems. The Hill Tribes of Chiang Rai still use the leaves as an ingredient in a stew and are much valued for their mild spinach-like taste. They are also served...View more Content

This wispy flower is an edible and ornamental plants related to amaranth that originated in East Africa’s highlands. It is used as a treatment for intestinal worms, blood diseases, mouth sores and eye problems. The Hill Tribes of Chiang Rai still use the leaves as an ingredient in a stew and are much valued for their mild spinach-like taste. They are also served with hot pepper, garlic, fresh lime, and red palm oil and eaten as a side dish.

Flower of the week: Blue Ginger

Countless restaurants have taken the name of Blue Ginger, this perennial herb native to Hawaii that sometimes appears growing wild. The sapphire blue to blue-purple flowers can sometimes reach a height of 2 meters. This species is andromonoecious, having both male flowers and bisexual flowers on the same plant. The fruit is an orange berry. The leaves have a spirally...View more Content

Countless restaurants have taken the name of Blue Ginger, this perennial herb native to Hawaii that sometimes appears growing wild. The sapphire blue to blue-purple flowers can sometimes reach a height of 2 meters. This species is andromonoecious, having both male flowers and bisexual flowers on the same plant. The fruit is an orange berry. The leaves have a spirally arrangement. The leaf sheaths wrap the stems. The Blue Ginger loves the moist and shady areas of Phu Chaisai’s 500 hectare estate

Dog of the Month: The Ultimate Naughty Boy

Vodka may look small but he is had as nails. Afraid of nothing, Vodka bosses the other, bigger dogs around. We are not sure what breed Vodka is or how he ended up here at Phu Chaisai. Vodka is loosely attached to the Rooms Division but tends to roam about according to his own schedule. Watch for him, he is a real character.

Languages spoken: Thai, Russian

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Vodka may look small but he is had as nails. Afraid of nothing, Vodka bosses the other, bigger dogs around. We are not sure what breed Vodka is or how he ended up here at Phu Chaisai. Vodka is loosely attached to the Rooms Division but tends to roam about according to his own schedule. Watch for him, he is a real character.

Languages spoken: Thai, Russian

Flower of the week: Lotus

The Lotus is the supreme flower at Phu Chaisai; symbols of purity and 'spontaneous' generation and hence symbolize divine birth. According to Buddhism, the heart of the beings is like an unopened lotus: when the virtues of the Buddha develop therein the lotus blossoms. This is why the Buddha sits on a lotus in bloom in depictions. The lotuses are differentiated...View more Content

The Lotus is the supreme flower at Phu Chaisai; symbols of purity and 'spontaneous' generation and hence symbolize divine birth. According to Buddhism, the heart of the beings is like an unopened lotus: when the virtues of the Buddha develop therein the lotus blossoms. This is why the Buddha sits on a lotus in bloom in depictions. The lotuses are differentiated by their color with the Pink Lotus of Phu Chaisai reserved for the highest deity, the historical Buddha.



Lake Mae Suai

Thai Buddhist Wedding
About an hour from Phu Chaisai is one of our favorite places in Chiang Rai and on almost no maps, Lake Mae Suai. Almost deserted of people during the week the beautiful fresh water lake is ringed by forest and home to caves that are rarely explored. A wonderful little fish restaurant selling fresh lake fish and Thai food is the only building of any kind...View more Content

About an hour from Phu Chaisai is one of our favorite places in Chiang Rai and on almost no maps, Lake Mae Suai. Almost deserted of people during the week the beautiful fresh water lake is ringed by forest and home to caves that are rarely explored.

A wonderful little fish restaurant selling fresh lake fish and Thai food is the only building of any kind at the lake, and is not to be missed.

Mae Suai is a small community that is comprised of many Akha Hilltribes and Thai peoples. Off the established tourist track this fantastic little community and its beautiful nature is hiding from the tourist hordes even thought it is in plain site. We love to recommend this little piece of paradise as a lunch stopover on the way to our favorite hot springs, in Fang.

But that is a story for another day.

Naming Nuts

Bamboo Cottage
I always thought Macadamia nuts only came from Hawaii. I lived in Thailand eleven years and never knew they also come from Chiang Rai. That is, until I came to Phu Chaisai. Take a look at the photo; on the right are the green nuts fresh from the tree and on the left are the roasted nuts in their shell. So, no need to go all the way to Honolulu to taste macadamia...View more Content

I always thought Macadamia nuts only came from Hawaii. I lived in Thailand eleven years and never knew they also come from Chiang Rai. That is, until I came to Phu Chaisai.

Take a look at the photo; on the right are the green nuts fresh from the tree and on the left are the roasted nuts in their shell. So, no need to go all the way to Honolulu to taste macadamia nuts when they grow right here in the forests of Chiang Rai. And they taste a lot better here – dry, firm and richly flavored.

Macadamia oil is prized for containing approximately 22% of the omega-7 palmitoleic acid, which makes it a botanical alternative to mink oil. This relatively high content of "cushiony" palmitoleic acid plus macadamia's high oxidative stability makes it a desirable ingredient in skin care products.

October 2012

A note from some happy guests

Dear Steven, Many thanks for the pictures and your nice words. We truly enjoyed our stay at your Resort and we will always remember your recommendation for the delicious dinner. In the meantime we arrived in Chiang Khong and are enjoying the great view on Mekong River. Our best wishes for you and your family and say hello to Tank and Hanna,...View more Content

Dear Steven,

Many thanks for the pictures and your nice words. We truly enjoyed our stay at your Resort and we will always remember your recommendation for the delicious dinner.

In the meantime we arrived in Chiang Khong and are enjoying the great view on Mekong River.

Our best wishes for you and your family and say hello to Tank and Hanna, too ;-)

Claudia & Stefan Aeberhard
Switzerland

Flower of the week – Siam Tulip

This rare and delicate forest flower known as The Siam Tulip is native to northern Thailand right here in Chiang Rai, and also parts of neighboring Laos. Despite its name, the Siam Tulip is not related to the tulip, but to the various ginger species such as turmeric. It can grow as an indoor plant, and is also sold as cut flowers. One of the most famous wild fields...View more Content

This rare and delicate forest flower known as The Siam Tulip is native to northern Thailand right here in Chiang Rai, and also parts of neighboring Laos. Despite its name, the Siam Tulip is not related to the tulip, but to the various ginger species such as turmeric. It can grow as an indoor plant, and is also sold as cut flowers. One of the most famous wild fields of Siam Tulips is in the Pa Hin Ngam National Park in the Chaiyaphum province of Thailand. But you don’t need to drive so far to see them when they are right here in abundance.

Flower of the week: Angels Trumpet

The Angels Trumpet is a large shrub that can reach heights of three or four meters. The leaves are covered with fine hairs and the flowers are large, trumpet-shaped extravaganzas that come in shades of white, yellow, pink, orange, green, or red. Ours have a strong, pleasing fragrance that is noticeable in the evening and that attracts pollinating moths. The...View more Content

The Angels Trumpet is a large shrub that can reach heights of three or four meters. The leaves are covered with fine hairs and the flowers are large, trumpet-shaped extravaganzas that come in shades of white, yellow, pink, orange, green, or red. Ours have a strong, pleasing fragrance that is noticeable in the evening and that attracts pollinating moths.

The flowers contain a number of alkaloids with medical value for their narcotic and anesthetic properties, although many of these alkaloids are now artificially synthesized. Angels Trumpet is the flower traditionally used in many South American indigenous cultures in medical preparations and as a ritualistic hallucinogen to communicate with ancestors, or as a poison in sorcery and black magic, All parts of Angels Trumpet are potentially poisonous, with the seeds and leaves being especially dangerous, so we recommend you look but don’t touch (or eat).

Dog of the month: Toss the ball to Miss Havana

Havana is a sweet and gentle four year old female Doberman who lives for playing with a tennis ball. She has a beautiful cigar wrapper color coat, hence the name. Havana comes to Phu Chaisai by way of Black Iron Warrior breeders in Serbia, where here mom and dad were six time champions and two times in Italy.

Languages spoken: English, Russian

September 2012

Flower of the week: Macuna

This gorgeous, fiery climbing vine thrives in the woodlands of Phu Chaisai’s subtropical mountains. The distinctive curved petals and seed are actually a legume, and Mucuna plants bear pods that are generally bat-pollinated. So, at night, when you catch a glimpse of the forest bats whizzing past, you can be pretty sure they are on their way to the Macuna plants...View more Content

This gorgeous, fiery climbing vine thrives in the woodlands of Phu Chaisai’s subtropical mountains. The distinctive curved petals and seed are actually a legume, and Mucuna plants bear pods that are generally bat-pollinated. So, at night, when you catch a glimpse of the forest bats whizzing past, you can be pretty sure they are on their way to the Macuna plants for a late night snack.

Dog of the month: Bubble Boy

Hi, my name is Bubble Boy and I am a Husky with an allergy of unknown origin; I live in a bubble but I don’t mind because it gets me lots of attention and scratches. As soon as the season changes my allergy will go away and I will be just another ordinary dog again. But, for now, I am enjoying my fame. Hurry and come scratch me before I get better and they take...View more Content

Hi, my name is Bubble Boy and I am a Husky with an allergy of unknown origin; I live in a bubble but I don’t mind because it gets me lots of attention and scratches. As soon as the season changes my allergy will go away and I will be just another ordinary dog again. But, for now, I am enjoying my fame. Hurry and come scratch me before I get better and they take my bubble away.

Languages spoken: Thai, sign language

Flower of the week: Cosmos

Open your mind to the Cosmos – flowers, that is. Here in Chiang Rai the Cosmos flowers about the same time as Zinnia and we like to grow them together near each other. The Cosmos is native to meadowland in Mexico and is a perennial plant which arranges itself in opposite pairs. The flower color is variable between the different species but ours tend to be golden...View more Content

Open your mind to the Cosmos – flowers, that is. Here in Chiang Rai the Cosmos flowers about the same time as Zinnia and we like to grow them together near each other. The Cosmos is native to meadowland in Mexico and is a perennial plant which arranges itself in opposite pairs. The flower color is variable between the different species but ours tend to be golden yellow.

Flower of the week: Gardenia

The beautiful white gardenia is happy at home here in the subtropical forest climate of Chiang Rai. Gardenias are evergreen shrubs that are capable of growing to 15 meters tall in the forest. The leaves have an attractive whorl shape and the flowers are solitary white clusters with a tubular-based corolla. The Gardenia species are strongly scented and a joy to inhale.

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The beautiful white gardenia is happy at home here in the subtropical forest climate of Chiang Rai. Gardenias are evergreen shrubs that are capable of growing to 15 meters tall in the forest. The leaves have an attractive whorl shape and the flowers are solitary white clusters with a tubular-based corolla. The Gardenia species are strongly scented and a joy to inhale.

Flower of the week: Orange Orchid

The orchid is ubiquitous at Phu Chaisai. They come in a dazzling array of colors and sizes, some growing on trees and some hanging in the air. Today, we present the Orange colored orchid.

Fearless Housekeeper

Mountain Cottage Bathroom
Meet Khun Lek, our fearless housekeeper. In Thai, Lek means small and Khun Lek is small indeed. Lovable Tank and Havana strike fear into the hearts of the biggest men who don’t know them, but even though they almost tower over Khun Lek, she has no fear, only love in her heart for these two loving dogs. Neither dark of night, rain nor Dobermans can keep Lek from...View more Content

Meet Khun Lek, our fearless housekeeper. In Thai, Lek means small and Khun Lek is small indeed. Lovable Tank and Havana strike fear into the hearts of the biggest men who don’t know them, but even though they almost tower over Khun Lek, she has no fear, only love in her heart for these two loving dogs. Neither dark of night, rain nor Dobermans can keep Lek from her appointed housekeeping rounds.

So, next time you think Dobermans are dangerous, think of Lek.

Flower of the week: Pink Ginger

Countless restaurants have taken the name of Blue Ginger, this perennial herb native to Hawaii, that sometimes appears growing wild. The sapphire blue to blue-purple flowers can sometimes reach a height of 2 meters. This species is andromonoecious, having both male flowers and bisexual flowers on the same plant. The fruit is an orange berry. The leaves have a spirally...View more Content

Countless restaurants have taken the name of Blue Ginger, this perennial herb native to Hawaii, that sometimes appears growing wild. The sapphire blue to blue-purple flowers can sometimes reach a height of 2 meters. This species is andromonoecious, having both male flowers and bisexual flowers on the same plant. The fruit is an orange berry. The leaves have a spirally arrangement. The leaf sheaths wrap the stems. The Blue Ginger loves the moist and shady areas of Phu Chaisai’s 500 hectare estate.

Flower of the week: Plumbago

This week we introduce the Plumbago of Chiang Rai, a shady forest favorite here at Phu Chaisai. Despite its bright red color the Plumbago was once prized for the ability of its sap to create lead-colored stains on skin and it was subsequently mistakenly thought to be a cure for lead poisoning. The flowers secrete sticky mucilage that is capable of trapping...View more Content

This week we introduce the Plumbago of Chiang Rai, a shady forest favorite here at Phu Chaisai. Despite its bright red color the Plumbago was once prized for the ability of its sap to create lead-colored stains on skin and it was subsequently mistakenly thought to be a cure for lead poisoning.

The flowers secrete sticky mucilage that is capable of trapping and killing insects; it is unclear if the plant uses this as protection from pollination by way of "crawlers” or possible protocarnivory. We do know it’s a gorgeous accent of color in our forest.

Dog of the Month: Pyrenees Mountain Dog

My name is Bu and I am the big dog at the resort. I am very gentle and loving but I was born to run. I am a mountain dog and have a long stride; I can range the three kilometers of the resort here and back in a few hours and not even be out of breath. My favorite activity is to run ahead and surprise you, that I know where you are going and that I can arrive there...View more Content

My name is Bu and I am the big dog at the resort. I am very gentle and loving but I was born to run. I am a mountain dog and have a long stride; I can range the three kilometers of the resort here and back in a few hours and not even be out of breath. My favorite activity is to run ahead and surprise you, that I know where you are going and that I can arrive there before you.

Now I have to go to the river and get all muddy because my owners just gave me a bath. Ha ha, soon I will be dirty again and will get another bath; I love the attention. Got to go, the river is calling.

Flower of the week: Chinese Rose

The Chinese Rose is native to Southwest China in Guizhou, Hubei, and Sichuan Provinces and can grow to two meters tall. In the wild the flowers have five pink to red petals. The species is extensively cultivated in China and is used in traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of swollen thyroid. We don’t treat too many swollen thyroids at Phu Chaisai but...View more Content

The Chinese Rose is native to Southwest China in Guizhou, Hubei, and Sichuan Provinces and can grow to two meters tall. In the wild the flowers have five pink to red petals. The species is extensively cultivated in China and is used in traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of swollen thyroid. We don’t treat too many swollen thyroids at Phu Chaisai but we do enjoy the beauty of the Chinese Rose every day.

Flower of the week: Bromeliad

The most famous bromeliad in Chiang Rai is the Phu Lae miniature pineapple. Another kind of bromeliad that grows in our forest is this one, the red Bromeliad. A kind of ornamental pineapple, it is unique because it is actually related to Spanish moss. Many bromeliads are able to store water in a structure formed by their tightly-overlapping leaf bases.

Flower of the week: Curcuma

Related to Turmeric and the Siam Tulip, the name Curcuma comes from Arabic kurkum meaning "turmeric". This tremblingly delicate purple and white star shaped flower is one of Phu Chaisai’s most treasured gifts from nature. The species here at Phu Chaisai is native of Thailand.

Flower of the week: Zinnia

The solitary long-stemmed Zinnia flowers have emerged from their rainy season slumber to grace Phu Chaisai with their magenta colored petals. These native dry grassland flowers from the Southwestern United States love the grassy sections of Chiang Rai’s mountain ranges. We grow our Zinnias from seed, and they reseed themselves each year. Zinnias are especially...View more Content

The solitary long-stemmed Zinnia flowers have emerged from their rainy season slumber to grace Phu Chaisai with their magenta colored petals. These native dry grassland flowers from the Southwestern United States love the grassy sections of Chiang Rai’s mountain ranges. We grow our Zinnias from seed, and they reseed themselves each year. Zinnias are especially favored by our butterflies and when you visit you will find our Zinnias attract them in large numbers.

Dog of the month: Shake hands with Mr. Tank.

Tank is one of the newest additions to the Phu Chaisai collection of lovable pets. Despite his fearsome appearance Tank is actually a sweet little boy whose greatest love is making people laugh while playing tug of war with rope. Tank comes to Phu Chaisai by way of Ukraine, where his mom and dad were four time champions.

Languages spoken: English, Russian

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Tank is one of the newest additions to the Phu Chaisai collection of lovable pets. Despite his fearsome appearance Tank is actually a sweet little boy whose greatest love is making people laugh while playing tug of war with rope. Tank comes to Phu Chaisai by way of Ukraine, where his mom and dad were four time champions.

Languages spoken: English, Russian

Flower of the week: The Hibiscus

Known as Rosell in Thailand, the Hibiscus is much loved as a morning breakfast drink served at our buffet. Rich in vitamin C, the Hibiscus is as good for you as it is good tasting.

Flower of the week: The Purple Orchid

The orchid is ubiquitous at Phu Chaisai. They come in a dazzling array of colors and sizes, some growing on trees and some hanging in the air. Today, we present the purple colored orchid.

Flower of the week: Ginger Lily

Ginger lily is the famous garland flower of Thailand so often presented with a cold welcome towel or strung onto a garland in taxis and buses. The species growing in Chiang Rai are originally from the Malay Peninsula and have aerial roots exposed to the humid atmosphere. The sweetly scented flowers are borne in spirally arranged clusters. Such a wonderful fragrance.

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Ginger lily is the famous garland flower of Thailand so often presented with a cold welcome towel or strung onto a garland in taxis and buses. The species growing in Chiang Rai are originally from the Malay Peninsula and have aerial roots exposed to the humid atmosphere. The sweetly scented flowers are borne in spirally arranged clusters. Such a wonderful fragrance.

Flower of the week: Cotton Rose

The delicate, willowy Cotton Rose is a white and pink colored Hibiscus variety and its flowers are white in the morning, turning pink during noon and red in the evening of the same day. The Cotton Rose was at one time very common in the area of the Confederate States of America, but loves the rich, well-drained soil of Phu Chaisai forests. The leaves can be used...View more Content

The delicate, willowy Cotton Rose is a white and pink colored Hibiscus variety and its flowers are white in the morning, turning pink during noon and red in the evening of the same day. The Cotton Rose was at one time very common in the area of the Confederate States of America, but loves the rich, well-drained soil of Phu Chaisai forests. The leaves can be used to treat swellings and skin infections and mucilage from flowers and leaves is used by midwives to facilitate delivery during labor. In ancient China, the flowers were used to represent beautiful ladies in historical paintings.

Flower of the week: Hydrangea

OK, I admit it; I used to think the Hydrangea was a “grandmother’s” flower. Little did I know it originated in the Himalayas and has been propagated in almost every country of the world. By far the greatest diversity is in eastern Asia, notably China, Japan, and Korea. Most are shrubs 1 to 3 meters tall, but some are small trees, and others lianas reaching...View more Content

OK, I admit it; I used to think the Hydrangea was a “grandmother’s” flower. Little did I know it originated in the Himalayas and has been propagated in almost every country of the world. By far the greatest diversity is in eastern Asia, notably China, Japan, and Korea. Most are shrubs 1 to 3 meters tall, but some are small trees, and others lianas reaching up to 30 meters by climbing up trees. They can be either deciduous or evergreen, though the widely cultivated temperate species are all deciduous.

With their unique “Mophead” flowers on large round flower heads resembling pom-poms, the Hydrangea is the ultimate wall-flower flower - under appreciated, and overlooked. Take a second look next time you see one; they are really adorable and deserving of our attention.

Flower of the week: Fragrant Iris

Stunningly beautiful to the eye, fragrantly scented, the Fragrant Iris is a favorite of ours and of wild honeybees. Somewhat resembling an Orchid, the Fragrant Iris is a tantalizing treat for the senses. Take a closer look at the picture to see the honeybee collecting pollen for use in making Phu Chaisai’s organic wild honey. Ah, that’s a story for another time.

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Stunningly beautiful to the eye, fragrantly scented, the Fragrant Iris is a favorite of ours and of wild honeybees. Somewhat resembling an Orchid, the Fragrant Iris is a tantalizing treat for the senses. Take a closer look at the picture to see the honeybee collecting pollen for use in making Phu Chaisai’s organic wild honey. Ah, that’s a story for another time.

Guests of the Month

October 2012
Guest of the month at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand
September 2012
Guest of the month at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand
Guest of the month at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand
November 2012
Guest of the month at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand
Guest of the month at Phu Chaisai Mountain Resort & Spa, Chiang Rai, Thailand

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Life at phu chaisai

River Ride
Bongo fun
Cooking Class
Thai Music Night